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Suicide Help

Over 4500 people take their own lives each year and suicide is the biggest killer of young men in England and Wales. That’s 2 awful facts. People who feel depressed, irritable and down don’t have to feel that the only way out is to kill themselves. While suicide is more common than we’d like to admit, it doesn’t mean that it’s the answer for you.

You can feel suicidal for all sorts of reasons:

  • Something might have happened to you that has upset you a great deal.
  • When someone close to you has attempted or completed taking their own life.
  • You have been using drugs or drinking heavily.
  • You may be upset and angry for no reason at all. This is very frightening. People become depressed not just because sad things happen to them in their lives. The chemicals in the brain which control how happy and sad we feel can get messed up, so that they’re not in balance and we feel depressed.
  • A combination of any of these things.

Feeling suicidal is actually fairly common. It’s normal for people to get into situations that make them panic, and they briefly think about wanting to take their own life. It’s a passing feeling and normal, so long as those feelings don’t last too long or become too intrusive. When they start taking control of what you’re thinking, then it can be dangerous and you should talk to someone about how you’re feeling. Don’t only sit there and let your mind run wild – Talk it through.

It’s hard to generalise, but many people who think about taking their own lives:

  • Are very sensitive to failure or criticism.
  • Feel like they have no friends.
  • Set themselves targets which are difficult to achieve.
  • Find it hard to cope with disappointment.
  • Find it difficult to admit to having problems they don’t know how to solve.
  • Find it hard to tell others how they are feeling.

Most suicidal people don’t actually want to die, they want an answer to their problems. It’s a decision made when other decisions seem impossible. While suicide can seem like the only way to deal with the pain, there’s ALWAYS another way – it’s just finding it that can sometimes be tricky. So don’t try and find it on your own. Two heads are better than one. Talk it over with someone. Tell them what you’re thinking and why.

If you’re feeling worthless, hopeless about the future or believe that no one cares about you – or even that the world would be a better place without you – talk to CALM.

CALM’s advisors are there to listen, not to judge, have links with other helpful organisations and could offer you the support you need to stop feeling sad and suicidal.

You can call us between 5pm and midnight every night of the week on:

0800 58 58 58

or Text:

07537 404717

Include CALM2 at the beginning of your first message. Texts are confidential and anonymous. We don’t charge, but your network might.

Our lines are open 7 days a week, 5pm to midnight. Calls are free from landlines, confidential, anonymous and they won’t show up on your phone bill. Trained, paid staff will be available to talk through problems, listen, and offer information. Calls are free from payphones and from mobiles on 3, Virgin, Orange and Vodafone networks.

Worried about someone

HOPELineUK is staffed by professionally qualified advisers who can give support, practical advice and information to anyone who is concerned that a young person they know may be suicidal.

Hopeline aims to:

  • Support those who live or work with suicidal young people
  • Commission research and campaign for change
  • Share expertise and good practice
  • Produce resources for families and professionals

The line is open Monday – Friday from 10am – 5pm and 7pm – 10pm, and 2pm – 5pm on weekends.

Tel 0800 068 41 41

Who can call HOPEline UK?

  • Young people (35 and under)
  • Family and concerned friends
  • Medics and mental health professionals
  • Schools, Colleges and Universities
  • Others who work with young people

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